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Home Gardens Musings Personal Sustainability: How-To Recipes Uncategorized

Let the Foraging & Gardening Begin!

April from Philo

Our landscape is greening more and more every day.  Buds swell and flower, new birds arrive daily, and early greens are emerging.

Pussy Willows

The first cold hardy seeds and seedlings are planted in our garden.  Whenever it is dry enough, I try to get into the garden to stay ahead of weeding and garden bed preparation.  It’s best to work the soil when it’s not too wet, which can be tricky at this time of year!  By having several garden beds ready to go, there’s always space when I’m ready to plant the next thing.  Seeds and seedlings I plant in April include: peas, spinach, arugula, lettuce, kale, chard, cilantro, beets, radishes, and onions.  I’ve started most of our brassicas (broccoli, cauliflower, kohlrabi, Brussels sprouts) inside – they will be the next to go out.  Carrots and parsnips are also on my list to plant in the next few weeks.

nettles-growing

Stinging nettles and dandelion greens have emerged and are young, tender, and delicious at this time of year.  They also happen to be loaded with nutrients and are exactly what our bodies need as they awake for spring.  I love this post by Urban Moonshine about harvesting dandelions in early spring.   Dandelions’ bitter qualities are what make them health-giving but can also turn people off from foraging and eating wild plants.  Nettles, on the other hand, are quite mild and can be used instead of spinach when cooking.  Here is a post with harvesting instructions and numerous ideas for using nettles in your meals.  Check out this post if you’re interested in other yummy plants to forage in the early spring.

dandelion-familyHappy foraging, happy gardening, happy spring!

P.S. Our naturally dyed deviled eggs came out great!  This year’s notes: my green is in need of improvement, and I learned to be cautious when playing with salt, baking soda and vinegar for my blue dye…avoiding blue volcanos in the kitchen is generally a good idea 🙂

Natural Easter Eggs

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Musings Recipes Uncategorized

April in Vermont

april snow

April arrived in true Vermont style: with a blizzard.  Luckily, we live in a state where friends and neighbors revel in the snow.  We all enjoyed one more dose of sledding, skiing, snowshoeing, and snowball fights followed by a cozy night by the fire.

scilla

One week later, temperatures climbed past 75 degrees, we enjoyed the first blooms in our garden, and planted peas and spinach.  Ahhhh, April in VT.  After enjoying these mild days, I need to remind myself that a few more dramatic swings are likely before the weather turns truly springy.

colorful-egg-outsides

With Easter right around the corner, I’m getting ready to do another batch of naturally died deviled eggs.  Everyone’s backyard chickens increase production as the days grow longer, so there are always plenty of delicious eggs to play with at this time of year.  After hard boiling them and removing the shells, I’ll soak a few eggs in each of the following solutions:

-Yellow: Boil water and add 1T turmeric.  After solution has cooled, add a splash of apple cider vinegar and a dash of salt.
-Blue: Boil water and add 1/4 cup elderberries and 1 teaspoon baking soda.  (If adding apple cider vinegar and a dash of salt, do so slowly to avoid volcanoes 🙂
-Red: Boil water and add three slices of beet.  After solution has cooled, add a splash of apple cider vinegar and a dash of salt.
-Green, orange, purple…?: This year I’ll be experimenting with combining the brines above to see what other colors are possible.

After they’ve soaked several hours (or longer), I’ll slice my eggs in half and devil them.  Mix egg yolks, mustard, mayonnaise, lemon juice, finely diced red onions, salt, black pepper and relish to taste.  Mix until creamy and spoon filling into egg whites.

colorful-egg-platter

Happy Easter, Happy Passover, Happy Spring!

Categories
Home Gardens Personal Sustainability: How-To

The April Garden

wild leeks ramps photoThe dry start to April allowed us to get a nice swatch of garden tilled and ready to plant.  So in went the pea seeds!  We covered last fall’s late crop of spinach with layer of hay, and the survivors have now been transplanted into a row flanked by rows of new seed.  Garlic leaves have emerged from their hay mulch.  The wierd bulb and crinkled new leaves of rhubarb seems to be hatching from the ground.  Perennials like chives, sorrel, and horseradish have beautiful tender young leaves.   Ramps (wild leeks) are the first edible plants to green the riverbank.  We’re dreaming of fiddleheads and asparagus!

pogo-gardener

garlic

peas-and-spinach

rhubarb(Photos from top: Wild leeks/ramps, pogo helps out!, , garlic shoots, peas and spinach, and emerging rhubarb)